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Home Hoaxes Not All Heroes Are People – Daisy The Dog Hoax

Not All Heroes Are People – Daisy The Dog Hoax

by Brett M. Christensen

This story was first published on November 2nd, 2006

Outline

This message tells the story of Daisy, a guide dog who lead her blind owner and almost 1000 others out of the doomed WTC towers after the 9/11 terrorist attack. 

Brief Analysis

The story is a work of fiction. The event described never took place. Although dogs did play a role in rescuing people from the World Trade Center, the claim that one dog – named Daisy or otherwise – single-handedly saved 967 people is utter nonsense.

Examples

SUPER STORY !!!!!

Hi Folks

We use the word ‘hero’ a lot these days. Most of the time it is used to describe sports personalities which is, in my opinion, an abuse of the word and an insult to real heroes.

Here is a hero who has rightly earned the appellation of ‘Hero.’

James Crane worked on the 101st floor of Tower 1 of the World Trade Center. He is blind so he has a golden retriever named Daisy.

After the plane hit 20 stories below, James knew that he was doomed, so he let Daisy go, out of an act of love. She darted away into the darkened hallway.

Choking on the fumes of the jet fuel and the smoke James was just waiting to die. About 30 minutes later Daisy comes back along with James’ boss, who Daisy just happened to pick up on floor 112.

On her first run of the building, she leads James, James’ boss, and about 300 more people out of the doomed building.

But she wasn’t through yet, she knew there were others who were trapped. So, highly against James’ wishes she ran back in the building.

On her second run, she saved 392 lives. Again she went back in. During this run, the building collapses.

James hears about this and falls on his knees into tears.

Against all known odds, Daisy makes it out alive, but this time she is carried by a firefighter.

“She led us right to the people, before she got injured” the fireman explained.

Her final run saved another 273 lives. She suffered acute smoke inhalation, severe burns on all four paws, and a broken leg, but she saved 967 lives.

Daisy is the first civilian Canine to win the Medal of Honor of New York City.

Daisy dog Hoax Story 1

 

Subject: FW: FW: NOT ALL HEROES ARE PEOPLE

What an amazing story.

NOT ALL HEROES ARE PEOPLE

Daisy Dog Hoax Story 2

James Crane worked on the 101st floor of Tower 1 of the World Trade Center. He is blind so he has a golden retriever named Daisy. After the plane hit 20 stories below, James knew that he was doomed, so he let Daisy go, out of an act of love. She darted away into the darkened hallway. Choking on the fumes of the jet fuel and the smoke James was just waiting to die. About 30 minutes later, Daisy came back along with James’ Boss, who Daisy just happened to pick up on floor 112.

On her first run of the building, she lead James, James’ boss, and about 300 more people out of the doomed building. But she wasn’t through yet, she knew there were others who were trapped. So, highly against James’ wishes she ran back in the building.

On her second run, she saved 392 lives. Again she went back in. During this run, the building collapsed. James heard about this and fell to his knees into tears. Against all known odds, Daisy made it out alive, but this time she was carried by a firefighter. “She led us right to the people before she got injured” the fireman explained.

Her final run saved another 273 lives. She suffered acute smoke inhalation, severe burns on all four paws, and a broken leg, but she saved 967 lives. The Next week, Mayor Guilaini rewarded Daisy with the Canine Medal of Honor of New York. Daisy was the first civilian Canine to win such an honor.

Daisy Dog Hoax Story 3

I hope you enjoyed this story.? I thought it was terrific.

 

Detailed Analysis

This story of an intrepid canine hero who saved almost a thousand people from the WTC on 9/11 is truly inspiring. What a shame it is purely a work of fiction!

Versions of the tale have circulated since 2001. Earlier variants did not include pictures of ‘Daisy’ and claimed to be “copied from NEW YORK TIMES 9-19-01”. However, no such article appeared in the New York Times on that date or any other. Nor was information about Daisy’s deeds published in any other reputable news source. 
A later variant uses slightly different text and features a Wikimedia Commons picture of a male Golden Retriever named ‘Tucker’.

If the story were true, Daisy and her owner would have received a great deal of media attention. It is unthinkable that the story of a dog that saved 967 lives would have gone unnoticed and unpublished except in the form of an email forward.

There were several dogs that really did help to rescue people from the World Trade Center. Even though their deeds were not as spectacular as Daisy’s, these events were well publicized.

In fact, the author of the Daisy tale may have been inspired by genuine reports about the guide dog ‘Roselle’ and her owner Michael Hingson. On 9/11, Roselle successfully guided Michael from the 78th floor of the North Tower and on to safety. However, Roselle did not return to the building. Roselle was subsequently awarded the Dicken Medal from Britain for her deed.

‘Salty’, another guide dog, was also awarded the medal for guiding his owner from the WTC. New York Police dog, ‘Appollo’ was another to receive the medal on behalf of Ground Zero Search and Rescue dogs. Although these animal heroes helped to save lives on 9/11, none of them repeatedly returned alone to the building to lead hundreds of people to safety.

Moreover, the author possibly should have done a little more fact checking before distributing his or her tale. The message claims that Daisy rescued someone from ‘floor 112’. A formidable task in a building with only 110 stories.

Thus, even if it was originally inspired by real events, Daisy’s story is total fiction and it should not be forwarded. The tragedy of 9/11 produced many heroes, both human and animal. There is no need to distribute falsehoods when the truth is so apt to inspire.



Importance Notice

After considerable thought and with an ache in my heart, I have decided that the time has come to close down the Hoax-Slayer website.

These days, the site does not generate enough revenue to cover expenses, and I do not have the financial resources to sustain it going forward.

Moreover, I now work long hours in a full-time and physically taxing job, so maintaining and managing the website and publishing new material has become difficult for me.

And finally, after 18 years of writing about scams and hoaxes, I feel that it is time for me to take my fingers off the keyboard and focus on other projects and pastimes.

When I first started Hoax-Slayer, I never dreamed that I would still be working on the project all these years later or that it would become such an important part of my life. It's been a fantastic and engaging experience and one that I will always treasure.

I hope that my work over the years has helped to make the Internet a little safer and thwarted the activities of at least a few scammers and malicious pranksters.

A Big Thank You

I would also like to thank all of those wonderful people who have supported the project by sharing information from the site, contributing examples of scams and hoaxes, offering suggestions, donating funds, or helping behind the scenes.

I would especially like to thank David White for his tireless contribution to the Hoax-Slayer Facebook Page over many years. David's support has been invaluable, and I can not thank him enough.

Closing Date

Hoax-Slayer will still be around for a few weeks while I wind things down. The site will go offline on May 31, 2021. While I will not be publishing any new posts, you can still access existing material on the site until the date of closure.

Thank you, one and all!

Brett Christensen,
Hoax-Slayer