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Neil Trotter Lottery Win Advance Fee Scams

by Brett M. Christensen

Outline

Emails notify recipients that they have been selected to receive a large donation from UK Euromillions lottery winner Neil Trotter.

Brief Analysis

The emails are not from Neil Trotter and the recipients have not been awarded any money. Neil Trotter really did win a large lottery prize, but he is not randomly giving away millions of pounds to strangers via email. The messages are advance fee scams designed to trick recipients into sending money and personal information to criminals.

Examples

I am Neil Trotter, i am donating the sum of $750,000.00 USD to you and your family.
Contact me through my email at neiltrotter121@y[removed] for directories.this is not a bussiness address i am an not a bussiness man ok

 

Subject: Euromillion Winner!!!
Perfect Grettings,
My name is Neil Trotter the current winner of 108 million Pounds on the just concluded Euromillion Jackpot Draw for 2014, and i bring to you a perfect good news for such a perfect timing as this. I know this is surprising for you to have received this at this very early stage.
But because i just received the cheque on Friday 14th of March 2014 and i am excited, so i am willing to donate 1,000,000(One Million Great Britain Pounds) to you and as part of my effort to alleviate poverty and care for the less priveledged around the world,i have decided to donate to just 15 people around the globe which you are a part of.so do get back to us quickly via email at: neiltrotter002@163.com
Perfect Regards.
Neil Trotter.

 

I am Neil TrotterLets do this charity togetherRevert back via only (neil330trot39onchadon@gmail.com)(Text in attached Microsoft Word document)Perfect Greetings,

My name is Neil Trotter the current winner of 108 million Pounds on the Euro million Jackpot Draw for 2014, and i bring to you perfect good news for such a perfect timing as this. I know this is surprising for you to have received this at this stage But because of my last year unexpected blessings am excited so i am willing to donate 5,000,000(five Million Great Britain Pounds) to you and as part of my effort to alleviate poverty and care for the less privileged around the world have decided to donate to just 5 people around the globe which you are a part of. <

so do get back me quickly via my personal email at (neil330trot39onchadon@gmail.com)

Do Provide the following information below when contacting me

Name:
Address:
Country of Residence:
Mobile Number:
Age:

Perfect Regards.
Neil Trotter.

 

Hi,
My name is Neil Trotter a recent winner of 107.9Million Pounds in the EuroMillion Jackpot Draw for March 2014. I have decided to donate part of my win to few persons around the globe and you are lucky to be one of them. I am willing to donate (One Million Pounds) to you as part of my effort to help alleviate poverty and with this you can carter for the less privileged ones in your society. I know it is surprising for you to have received this notification at this very time but, I believe this is the right time and I will be glad if you are willing to receive this donation and help out as well.
Do get back to me quickly via email at: neiltrotteruk@126.com
Best Regards,
Neil Trotter.

 

A Spanish version

Hola,
Hemos visto su correo y ya recibimos un aviso de Neil Trotter de que nos contactará por su donación de 750,000 dólares.
Envíenos los siguientes detalles a continuación para que podamos indicarle cómo realizar su transferencia a su cuenta personal.Tu nombre:
Dirección:
Número de teléfono:
Ocupación:
País Estado:
Número de cuenta:
Código Swift / Enrutamiento
Nombre y dirección del banco:

Gracias por realizar operaciones bancarias con Briton Federal Credit Union (BFCU).
Gracias

 

Detailed Analysis

Winners of large lotteries such as Euromillions are generally the subjects of various mainstream news reports. These reports tend to name the winners and discuss their backgrounds and future plans.

This is fertile ground for scammers who are quick to capitalise on news of such wins. The scammers are able to provide ‘evidence’ of their spurious claims by linking to one or more of these news reports. 
In March 2014, Neil Trotter, a UK car mechanic won a whopping 107 million pounds in the Euromillions lottery. Soon after, emails like the examples above began to be distributed.

Of course, the emails are not from Neil Trotter or anybody associated with him. And the recipients have not been awarded any portion of his winnings. The emails are typical advance fee scams designed to trick users into sending their money and personal information to criminals.

Those who reply as instructed will soon receive follow-up emails from the criminals who will continue to pretend that they are Neil Trotter. The emails will claim that, before they can receive their unexpected windfall, recipients must first pay for various fees associated with transferring the funds. The scammers will invent expenses such as insurance fees, taxation, banking fees, and legal costs. They will insist that, for legal reasons, these fees must be paid in advance.

If a victim complies and sends money as requested, further demands for money will follow. Often, requests for further fees will continue until the victim has nothing more to send or at last realises that he or she is being scammed. All of the money sent will line the pockets of the criminals and it is very unlikely that victims will ever get it back.

And, to make matters worse, the scammers may have been able to trick their victim into sending a large amount of personal and financial information. This information may later be used to steal the victim’s identity.

Be very wary of any email purporting to be from a lottery winner that claims that you have been awarded a large donation or grant. Lottery winners often do give away portions of their winnings to charity. However, they are extremely unlikely to randomly hand out millions of pounds to total strangers via email. Such a claim is simply absurd.



Importance Notice

After considerable thought and with an ache in my heart, I have decided that the time has come to close down the Hoax-Slayer website.

These days, the site does not generate enough revenue to cover expenses, and I do not have the financial resources to sustain it going forward.

Moreover, I now work long hours in a full-time and physically taxing job, so maintaining and managing the website and publishing new material has become difficult for me.

And finally, after 18 years of writing about scams and hoaxes, I feel that it is time for me to take my fingers off the keyboard and focus on other projects and pastimes.

When I first started Hoax-Slayer, I never dreamed that I would still be working on the project all these years later or that it would become such an important part of my life. It's been a fantastic and engaging experience and one that I will always treasure.

I hope that my work over the years has helped to make the Internet a little safer and thwarted the activities of at least a few scammers and malicious pranksters.

A Big Thank You

I would also like to thank all of those wonderful people who have supported the project by sharing information from the site, contributing examples of scams and hoaxes, offering suggestions, donating funds, or helping behind the scenes.

I would especially like to thank David White for his tireless contribution to the Hoax-Slayer Facebook Page over many years. David's support has been invaluable, and I can not thank him enough.

Closing Date

Hoax-Slayer will still be around for a few weeks while I wind things down. The site will go offline on May 31, 2021. While I will not be publishing any new posts, you can still access existing material on the site until the date of closure.

Thank you, one and all!

Brett Christensen,
Hoax-Slayer