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Home Bogus Warnings Misleading Warning about Missed Calls From +375 and +371 Numbers Outline

Misleading Warning about Missed Calls From +375 and +371 Numbers Outline

by Brett M. Christensen

This story was first published on September 7, 2012

Outline

Message circulating via SMS, social media and email warns you not to return missed calls from numbers starting with +375 or +371 because you will be charged between $15 and $30 for each returned call and your contact list and financial information will be instantly stolen from your phone. 

Brief Analysis

There are elements of truth to the warning but the information it contains is nevertheless highly misleading and inaccurate. Reports indicate that many people have been caught by a scam in which they were charged international call fees for returning a missed call from +375 or +371 phone numbers. However, this fee was reportedly much less than $15. Moreover, the claim that simply returning the calls can result in personal data being instantly stolen from the user’s phone is nonsense. It is not possible for information to be stolen from a phone in the way described.

Example

Subject: IMPORTANT – missed calls
Missed +375 calls

People have been receiving calls from +375602605281, +37127913091 or any number starting with a +375, or +371 number.

One ring and they hang up, leaving a missed call message. . If you call back it’s one of those numbers that are charged $15-$30 & they can copy your contact list in 3 sec. If you have bank or credit card details on your phone, they can copy that too. +375 is from Belarus and Afghanistan.. 371 is code for Latvia…

Don’t answer or call back.

Please FORWARD AND SHARE this to your friends and family.

 

Very Very Urgent …Please pass this message to your family and friends NOW.

People have been receiving calls from
Tel: +375602605281
Tel: +37127913091
Tel: +37178565072
Tel: +56322553736
Tel: +37052529259
Tel: +255901130460
or any number starting from +371 +375 +381

These guys only ring once and hang up.
If you call back,they can copy your contact list in 3sec and if you have a bank or credit card details on your phone, they can copy that too…

+375 code is for Belarus.
+371 code is for Lativa.
+381 Serbia.
+563 Valparaiso.
+370 Vilnius.
+255 Tanzania.

Don’t answer or Call back.

Also, Don’t Press
#90 or #09
on your Mobile when asked by any caller.

It’s a new trick which is use to access your SIM card, make calls at your expense and frame you as a criminal.

URGENTLY FORWARD this message to as many friends as you can to stop any intrusion!!!

 

Detailed Analysis

This message, which has circulated widely via SMS, email and social media in recent months, warns users not to call back missed calls from numbers starting with +375 and +371. According to the message, those who do call back such numbers will receive an immediate charge of $15 to $30. Moreover, claims the message, calling back one of the numbers will allow scammers to instantly copy the contact list from the caller’s phone and also steal any bank or credit card information stored on the phone.

While the warning contains an element of truth, it is otherwise highly misleading and inaccurate. Reports indicate that, during 2012, many people have indeed received suspect calls from numbers starting with +375 and +371. The calls typically ring once or twice and are then disconnected. 375 is the country code for Belarus. 371 is the country code for Latvia. Depending on their location, those who call the numbers back may be charged an international call fee, a portion of which may be paid to the scammers making the missed calls.

However, the claim that users who call the numbers back are automatically charged $15 to $30 appears to be unfounded. The figure of $15 may be a misinterpretation of reports that stated the calls were charged a fee of 15 Indian rupees (about 26 cents USD).
Moreover, the claim that simply calling the numbers will somehow magically allow criminals to steal contact lists and financial information from the calling phone is untrue. To steal such data, the criminals would have to hack into the phone in some way and this would obviously require much more than just calling a particular phone number.

Thus, it appears that initial speculation about the purpose of the phone calls and the motives of those responsible has fueled the spread of false and misleading information. And, at the time of writing, calling the two numbers listed in the warning results in automated “number not in service” messages. That said, people should be cautious of returning missed calls from phone numbers with those country codes unless they know the numbers or are expecting calls from those regions. Of course, while some calls with the country codes 375 or 371 may indeed be suspect as discussed above, the vast majority are likely to be perfectly normal calls from Belarus and Latvia.

Note:

One current version of the message tacks on a supposed warning about pressing  #90 or #09
on your mobile phone. The message claims that this is a “new trick” that allows the caller to access your sim card. However, this information is untrue. It is just one version of the old “90#” hoax, which has circulated in various forms for decades.



Importance Notice

After considerable thought and with an ache in my heart, I have decided that the time has come to close down the Hoax-Slayer website.

These days, the site does not generate enough revenue to cover expenses, and I do not have the financial resources to sustain it going forward.

Moreover, I now work long hours in a full-time and physically taxing job, so maintaining and managing the website and publishing new material has become difficult for me.

And finally, after 18 years of writing about scams and hoaxes, I feel that it is time for me to take my fingers off the keyboard and focus on other projects and pastimes.

When I first started Hoax-Slayer, I never dreamed that I would still be working on the project all these years later or that it would become such an important part of my life. It's been a fantastic and engaging experience and one that I will always treasure.

I hope that my work over the years has helped to make the Internet a little safer and thwarted the activities of at least a few scammers and malicious pranksters.

A Big Thank You

I would also like to thank all of those wonderful people who have supported the project by sharing information from the site, contributing examples of scams and hoaxes, offering suggestions, donating funds, or helping behind the scenes.

I would especially like to thank David White for his tireless contribution to the Hoax-Slayer Facebook Page over many years. David's support has been invaluable, and I can not thank him enough.

Closing Date

Hoax-Slayer will still be around for a few weeks while I wind things down. The site will go offline on May 31, 2021. While I will not be publishing any new posts, you can still access existing material on the site until the date of closure.

Thank you, one and all!

Brett Christensen,
Hoax-Slayer