Home ScamsScam Catalogue London Bombings Nigerian Scam

London Bombings Nigerian Scam

by Brett M. Christensen

Outline:
Email claims that the recipient may be entitled to a large sum of money as the next of kin of a person who died in the London bombings.


Status:
False(scam)

Example:
Dear [Name removed],

UPON THE INSTRUCTIONS

Based on the instructions of Her Majesty Queen of England, who directed most fund of money or assets of those that died in the last London Bomb blast should be realized to their families.

I am writing to you for a next of kin beneficiary of our customer who died in the bomb blast as well, he is [Name removed] beneficiary of A/C Number 00414610410 coded Account amount to $3.5 million. Inform us if you are related to this client, to enable us arrange and bring the money to you in your country.

With Regards.

Your responds:-Inform us your Mobile Tel, Fax number, Office Tel, for easy reach. On behalf of our Bank and the Government of Great Britain, We are so sorry for the lost of your relation. Confirm the Receipts of this message by reply mail



Detailed Analysis:
Predictably, the London bombings in July 2005 provided fresh material for Internet scammers. The Nigerian scam email included above is just one of many that attempt to capitalize on the terrorist attacks on London. The “next of kin” ruse is one that has been use countless times by Nigerian scammers in the past.

Scams messages such as the one above are designed to trick the recipient into responding. Those who initiate a dialogue with the scammers by replying to the scam messages will slowly be drawn deeper into the scam. Eventually, they will be asked for “advance fees” supposedly required to allow the deal to go ahead. Since they will probably be asked to provide a great deal of sensitive personal information, they may also become the victims of identity theft. For more information about Nigerian scams, see:



Importance Notice

After considerable thought and with an ache in my heart, I have decided that the time has come to close down the Hoax-Slayer website.

These days, the site does not generate enough revenue to cover expenses, and I do not have the financial resources to sustain it going forward.

Moreover, I now work long hours in a full-time and physically taxing job, so maintaining and managing the website and publishing new material has become difficult for me.

And finally, after 18 years of writing about scams and hoaxes, I feel that it is time for me to take my fingers off the keyboard and focus on other projects and pastimes.

When I first started Hoax-Slayer, I never dreamed that I would still be working on the project all these years later or that it would become such an important part of my life. It's been a fantastic and engaging experience and one that I will always treasure.

I hope that my work over the years has helped to make the Internet a little safer and thwarted the activities of at least a few scammers and malicious pranksters.

A Big Thank You

I would also like to thank all of those wonderful people who have supported the project by sharing information from the site, contributing examples of scams and hoaxes, offering suggestions, donating funds, or helping behind the scenes.

I would especially like to thank David White for his tireless contribution to the Hoax-Slayer Facebook Page over many years. David's support has been invaluable, and I can not thank him enough.

Closing Date

Hoax-Slayer will still be around for a few weeks while I wind things down. The site will go offline on May 31, 2021. While I will not be publishing any new posts, you can still access existing material on the site until the date of closure.

Thank you, one and all!

Brett Christensen,
Hoax-Slayer