Largest Tortoise Hoax
Home Hoaxes Hoax – Picture of ‘World’s Largest Tortoise’

Hoax – Picture of ‘World’s Largest Tortoise’

by Brett M. Christensen

This story was first published on May 4, 2012

Outline:
Social media message claims that an attached photograph depicts the world’s largest tortoise, found in the Amazon River, being transported along a roadway strapped to the bed of a large truck. A newer variant claims that the giant beast is a mutant caused by radiation leaked from the stricken Fukushima nuclear plant in Japan.


Brief Analysis:
The “tortoise” is not real. The picture is a scene from the 2006 Japanese movie “Gamera the Brave” which features a giant turtle creature. At one point in the movie, the wounded Gamera is transported via a military truck to a research facility. The circulating image is apparently taken from this part of the movie.

Example:
The Wolrd largest Tortise found in Amazon river its age around 529 /Hieght-59/Weight- 800 PoundsWorld largest tortoise hoax image

 

Example:
Giant Fukushima Mutant Turtle Finally Captured By Japanese MilitaryNoto, Japan – Japan had to call on US naval seal teams to help reel the the iron-shelled beast in. Weighing in at over 7 tons, the locals had taken to calling the newest Fukushima mutant, quite literally translating to The Great Demon King Koopa (Bowser) of modern lore.

(Message includes a copy of the image displayed above.)



Detailed Analysis:
According to this message, which has circulated widely via Facebook and other social media websites, an accompanying photograph depicts the world’s largest tortoise being transported on the bed of a truck. The message claims that the massive tortoise was found in the Amazon River, weighs 800 pounds and is 529 years old.

A newer message featuring the same image claims the giant beast is a mutant resulting from radiation leaked from the damaged Fukushima nuclear plant in Japan. The new version claims that the giant turtle was finally captured by the Japanese military. The Fukushima variant apparently originates from a fake “news” story published on the Topekasnews website.

Not surprisingly, the picture does not depict a real tortoise or turtle or even a “tortise”. The picture is in fact taken from a 2006 Japanese movie titled “Gamera the Brave”. The movie is one in a series of titles that feature a gigantic turtle with special powers. In this film, a young boy finds an egg that hatches a small turtle. The turtle grows very quickly and later flies away and does not return after the boy and his friends move him to an abandoned shack.

Later, the “kaiju” (strange beast or monster”), now enormous, reappears to do battle with the malevolent monster Zedus. However, the juvenile Gamera is bested by Zedus in the battle and is wounded. An article discussing the film on ScifiJapan.com explains what happens after the battle:

People line the streets to see Gamera. Before long, a military unit arrives and the unconscious kaiju is loaded onto a truck and transported to a research facility in Nagoya for scientific examination. Kousuke and Toru follow, and soon learn that the scientists have information that will hopefully help them to revive Gamera.

Presumably, the circulating image is taken from this portion of the film. The same snapshot is included in several articles about the movie.

Incidentally, if the massive beast shown in the picture was actually real, it would almost certainly weigh much more than 800 pounds as claimed in the message. The Galápagos tortoise, the largest living species of tortoise, reach weights of more than 550 pounds, although they are considerably smaller – around five feet or so for the larger animals – than the monster depicted in the picture. Although the Galápagos tortoise cannot fly or battle deadly monsters like Gamera can, they are remarkable creatures that can live for more than 100 years in the wild. And, unlike Gamera, they actually exist in real life.


Importance Notice

After considerable thought and with an ache in my heart, I have decided that the time has come to close down the Hoax-Slayer website.

These days, the site does not generate enough revenue to cover expenses, and I do not have the financial resources to sustain it going forward.

Moreover, I now work long hours in a full-time and physically taxing job, so maintaining and managing the website and publishing new material has become difficult for me.

And finally, after 18 years of writing about scams and hoaxes, I feel that it is time for me to take my fingers off the keyboard and focus on other projects and pastimes.

When I first started Hoax-Slayer, I never dreamed that I would still be working on the project all these years later or that it would become such an important part of my life. It's been a fantastic and engaging experience and one that I will always treasure.

I hope that my work over the years has helped to make the Internet a little safer and thwarted the activities of at least a few scammers and malicious pranksters.

A Big Thank You

I would also like to thank all of those wonderful people who have supported the project by sharing information from the site, contributing examples of scams and hoaxes, offering suggestions, donating funds, or helping behind the scenes.

I would especially like to thank David White for his tireless contribution to the Hoax-Slayer Facebook Page over many years. David's support has been invaluable, and I can not thank him enough.

Closing Date

Hoax-Slayer will still be around for a few weeks while I wind things down. The site will go offline on May 31, 2021. While I will not be publishing any new posts, you can still access existing material on the site until the date of closure.

Thank you, one and all!

Brett Christensen,
Hoax-Slayer