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‘Eagle Snatching Kid’ Viral Video is Fake

by Brett M. Christensen

Outline

A widely-circulated YouTube video appears to show an eagle swooping down and picking up a small child in a park before dropping him a short distance away. 

Brief Analysis

The video is not real footage. It is a clever fake created by students at a media-training centre. The video first went viral back in 2012, but again gained momentum in early 2014.

Example

 

Detailed Analysis

Back in 2012, the Interwebs were all abuzz with speculation about a viral video that seemingly depicted a large eagle swooping down and snatching a young child sitting on the grass in a park. In the video, the eagle attempts to take off with the child, but then drops him, apparently unharmed, a short distance away.

After the video was revealed as a fake, the buzz gradually subsided. But, jump forward to 2014, and the video is once again gaining momentum and circulating widely. 
So, once again, here is the truth about the video as posted by Centre Nad, the Canadian media training organization where it was created:

CENTRE NAD REASSURES MONTREALERS: NO DANGER OF BEING SNATCHED BY A ROYAL EAGLE
19 DECEMBER 2012

The ‘Golden Eagle Snatches Kid’ video, uploaded to YouTube on the evening of December 18, was made by Antoine Seigle, Normand Archambault, Loïc Mireault and Félix Marquis-Poulin, students at Centre NAD, in the production simulation workshop class of the Bachelors degree in 3D Animation and Digital Design.

The video shows a royal eagle snatching a young kid while he plays under the watch of his dad. The eagle then drops the kid a few feet away. Both the eagle and the kid were created in 3D animation and integrated in to the film afterwards.

The video has already received more than 1,200,000 views on YouTube and has been mentioned by dozens of media in Canada and abroad.

The production simulation workshop class, offered in fifth semester, aims to produce creative projects according to industry production and quality standards while developing team work skills.

An earlier hoax video created by the same class supposedly depicted a penguin that had escaped the Montreal zoo.



Importance Notice

After considerable thought and with an ache in my heart, I have decided that the time has come to close down the Hoax-Slayer website.

These days, the site does not generate enough revenue to cover expenses, and I do not have the financial resources to sustain it going forward.

Moreover, I now work long hours in a full-time and physically taxing job, so maintaining and managing the website and publishing new material has become difficult for me.

And finally, after 18 years of writing about scams and hoaxes, I feel that it is time for me to take my fingers off the keyboard and focus on other projects and pastimes.

When I first started Hoax-Slayer, I never dreamed that I would still be working on the project all these years later or that it would become such an important part of my life. It's been a fantastic and engaging experience and one that I will always treasure.

I hope that my work over the years has helped to make the Internet a little safer and thwarted the activities of at least a few scammers and malicious pranksters.

A Big Thank You

I would also like to thank all of those wonderful people who have supported the project by sharing information from the site, contributing examples of scams and hoaxes, offering suggestions, donating funds, or helping behind the scenes.

I would especially like to thank David White for his tireless contribution to the Hoax-Slayer Facebook Page over many years. David's support has been invaluable, and I can not thank him enough.

Closing Date

Hoax-Slayer will still be around for a few weeks while I wind things down. The site will go offline on May 31, 2021. While I will not be publishing any new posts, you can still access existing material on the site until the date of closure.

Thank you, one and all!

Brett Christensen,
Hoax-Slayer