Parcel Delivery Malware Email
Home Malware DHL Express ‘Parcel Arrival Notification’ Malware Email

DHL Express ‘Parcel Arrival Notification’ Malware Email

by Brett M. Christensen

This email, which purports to be from DHL Express,  is supposedly a pre-arrival notification for a parcel that has been delivered to your local post office.

The email instructs you to click a link to download and print a receipt that you can submit when picking up the parcel.

However, the email is not from DHL and clicking the link does not download a parcel delivery receipt. Instead, the link opens a website that harbours malware. Once on the bogus website, you will be instructed to click a “download” button.

If you do so, malware may be delivered to your computer. The exact nature of this malware may vary.

This type of attack is often used to distribute ransomware.  Once installed, ransomware can lock all the files on your computer and then demand that you pay a fee to online criminals to receive an unlock code.

In other cases, the malware may be designed to steal sensitive information such as banking passwords from the infected computer.

In recent years, fake parcel delivery notification emails have been repeatedly used by criminals to distribute various types of malware.

Be cautious of any email that claims that you must click a link or open an attached file to view details about a supposed parcel delivery.



An example of the malware email:

From: DHL EXPRESS

Subject: Parcel arrival notification 

 

Hi [email address],

 

This is a pre-arrival notification of your parcel to our local post office

 

Kindly Print/Download your DHL-AWD reciept to be submitted during pick-up.
Print/Download DHL-AWD reciept here

Kindly endeavour to be accurate as possible to reduce time of clearance and recipient confirmation.

Please add our email to your contact to guarantee inbox delivery. | 2018 DHL Express | Customer Service |

 

Importance Notice

After considerable thought and with an ache in my heart, I have decided that the time has come to close down the Hoax-Slayer website.

These days, the site does not generate enough revenue to cover expenses, and I do not have the financial resources to sustain it going forward.

Moreover, I now work long hours in a full-time and physically taxing job, so maintaining and managing the website and publishing new material has become difficult for me.

And finally, after 18 years of writing about scams and hoaxes, I feel that it is time for me to take my fingers off the keyboard and focus on other projects and pastimes.

When I first started Hoax-Slayer, I never dreamed that I would still be working on the project all these years later or that it would become such an important part of my life. It's been a fantastic and engaging experience and one that I will always treasure.

I hope that my work over the years has helped to make the Internet a little safer and thwarted the activities of at least a few scammers and malicious pranksters.

A Big Thank You

I would also like to thank all of those wonderful people who have supported the project by sharing information from the site, contributing examples of scams and hoaxes, offering suggestions, donating funds, or helping behind the scenes.

I would especially like to thank David White for his tireless contribution to the Hoax-Slayer Facebook Page over many years. David's support has been invaluable, and I can not thank him enough.

Closing Date

Hoax-Slayer will still be around for a few weeks while I wind things down. The site will go offline on May 31, 2021. While I will not be publishing any new posts, you can still access existing material on the site until the date of closure.

Thank you, one and all!

Brett Christensen,
Hoax-Slayer